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Public Art

  • Lee Aertson

    JAEHYO LEE

    Aertson Midtown Hotel
    Nashville, TN

    Jaehyo Lee’s suspended stone commission installed at the Aertson Midtown Hotel in Nashville, Tennessee.

  • Colossal RI

    COLOSSAL FRAGMENT

    LIONEL SMIT

    On view for INFLUX 2017
    Avenue Concept, Providence, RI

    The projects of INFLUX feature more than 20 works of art by local, national, and international artists–and include murals, sculptures, mosaics, and active/visual performances. The projects are concentrated in two locations: downtown Providence and the “Cultural Corridor” between Classical and Central High Schools.

     

  • Lee Decordova

    LOTUS

    JAEHYO LEE

    deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum
    Lincoln, MA

    Installed on deCordova’s main lawn, 0121-1110=113035 (Lotus) is a 20-foot pillar comprised of chestnut logs that have been burned, hand-carved, and assembled into a massive inverted cone. The sculpture bursts upwards like a tornado; its verticality resonates with the towering nearby trees on deCordova’s grounds. The surface of Lotus is highly polished to emphasize the natural beauty and variation of the bark and wood grain.

  • Siegel Kazahackstan

    BOTTLES WITH HANDLE

    STEVEN SIEGEL

    Artfest Astana, 2017
    Astana, Kazakstan

    Bottles With Handle was commissioned by Artfest Astana 2017, for Astana, Kazakhstan.  The theme of the exhibition is Sustainability and Nomadism, two issues that are of particular relevance to the people of Kazakhstan. The piece was fabricated at a facility outside of the city by a crew of 5 over the course of  4 days.  It is made of crushed plastic bottles, plastic mesh, and rubber hose.

  • Morphous Helen Day

    MORPHOUS

    LIONEL SMIT

    On view July 22 – October 21, 2017
    Helen Day Art Center
    90 Pond Street, Stowe, VT

    Morphous is an exploration of hybrid identity and its ever-changing nature in South Africa’s social landscape. It evokes a question of time, of past and future, and of the balance point at which my country finds itself, as it embarks on the next chapter of a post-apartheid and post-Mandela South Africa, a future South Africa. This “double-vision” is a foretelling and an acknowledgment of what has already passed, a societal commentary without judgment. The figures are charged with an emotive and gestural energy.

  • Anne Lindberg Aertson

    REDBERRY

    ANNE LINDBERG

    Site-based Installation Commission
    Midtown Aertson Hotel, Nashville, TN

    Working with subtle gradations of coral and red-hued threads, Anne Lindberg has created “redberry,” an installation made entirely of Egyptian cotton thread for the lobby of the vanguard new hotel, the Aeration, opening this month in Nashville, TN. An ombre of color that defines and enhances the architectural boundaries of the hotel’s lobby, “redberry” brings a tremendous vibrancy to the space, despite its minimal material. Collectively, the thousands of discrete threads, each individually placed, create a visual environment saturated with intense, dynamic color. Lindberg’s installation is a key artwork of the hotel’s new and unique, curated collection, and a wonderful example of the overall goal of this curatorial project.

  • Mabel Poblet Venice Biennale

    VENICE BIENNALE

    MABEL POBLET

    May 13 – November 26, 2017
    Cuban Pavillion, Venice, Italy

    Open to the public from Saturday, May 13th to Sunday, November 26th, 2017, at the Giardini and the Arsenale, the 57th International Art Exhibition, titled VIVA ARTE VIVA, will be curated by Christine Macel and organized by La Biennale di Venezia chaired by Paolo Baratta. The preview will take place on May 10th, 11th and 12th, the awards ceremony and inauguration will be held on Saturday, May 13th, 2017.

  • Gary Haven-Smith Outdoor Sculpture

    OUTDOOR SCULPTURE

    Gary Haven Smith

    On view through summer 2017
    The Barn @ 28 Main Street, Walpole, NH

    Gary Haven Smith creates abstract sculptures and paintings that explore the boundaries between the enduring aspects of past cultures and the fast-paced, technologically driven nature of modern life. While his granite sculptures may retain some of their natural qualities in form and surface, by utilizing the subtractive process of carving, Smith imposes geometric shapes, hard angles, and pierced forms into the stone. He creates visual passageways that pull our attention through the age of the stone to our contemporary world on the other side. These industrial facets are interspersed with more human-like, almost playful marks—gentle spirals and wavy lines—and often the addition of color. He takes full advantage of the ways in which light can add both clarity and a sense of mystery to three-dimensional forms.